War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0091 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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of the class mentioned in said order. There is a prisoner in irons here, a citizen, supposed to be a Saint Albans raider, and undergoing trial at this time, but does not come under your order.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN BURKE,

Lieutenant-Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FORT WARREN,

Boston Harbor, January 19, 1865.

Honorable GIDEON WELLES,

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: The officers and seamen of the steamer Florida are willing to give their parole to leave the United States within ten days after liberation, but they have not sufficient money to do so. They wish to be put on board of a steamer for Europe, but do not wish to be landed in Boston for fear of a mob. There are fifty in all.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. A. ALLEN,

Major, Second U. S. Artillery, Commanding Post.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, January 19, 1865.

Major-General DIX, New York:

Under no circumstances can prisoners of war be allowed to act as counsel for a person accused of being a spy.

C. A. DANA,

Assistant Secretary of War.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPT.,

EXCHANGE BUREAU,

Richmond, Va., January 19, 1865.

GENTLEMEN: In response to the inclosed resolution of inquiry of the Legislature of Virginia* in relation to the transmission of supplies to Confederate prisoners in the North I have the honor to submit the following report:

At the outset I would respectfully request your attention to the inclosed correspondence between the Honorable Robert Ould, agent of exchange on the part of the Confederate States, and Lieutenant General U. S. Grant, commanding Armies of the United States,+ for full information as to the agreement made between the two Governments for furnishing supplies to prisoners both on public account and by private contribution. It has been agreed that all private contributions shall be received at designated points and delivered free of cost by the party holding the prisoners for whom the supplies are intended. Prior to the 1st of November, 1864, and previous to the completion of the present extensive arrangements, we were enabled by the comparative regularity of the flag-of-truce boats to forward these individual contributions with but little delay. During the months of November and December we were engaged in the reception and delivery of prisoners at Savannah and

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*Not found.

+See Ould to Grant, October 30, 1864, Vol. VII, this series, p. 1063, and resulting correspondence.

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