War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0081 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS WEST'S BUILDINGS HOSPITAL,

Baltimore, Md., January 16, 1865.

Surg. A. CHAPEL, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding Hospital:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at this station for the week ending January 14, 1865:

Conduct--good. Cleanliness--good. Clothing--sufficient. Bedding--good. State of quarters--good. State of mess-houses--good. State of kitchen--good. Food, quality of--excellent. Food, quantity of--sufficient. Water--good. Sinks--good. Police of grounds--good. Drainage--good. Police of hospital--good. Attendance of sick--excellent. Hospital diet--good. General health of prisoners--good as could be expected from the nature of their wounds and diseases. Vigilance of guard--good.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HORATIO ROBERTS,

Second Lieutenant, Veteran Reserve Corps, and Inspecting Officer.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY PRISON,

Wheeling, W. Va., January 16, 1865.

Colonel JAMES WASHBURN, Military Commander of Wheeling:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at this station for the week ending January 15, 1865:

Conduct--good. Cleanliness--good. Clothing--good. Bedding--good. State of quarters--fine. State of mess-houses--good. State of kitchen--clean and in good order. Food, quality of--first rate. Food, quantity of--sufficient. Water--good. Sinks--good and clean. Police of grounds--good. Drainage--good. Police of hospital--very good. Attendance of sick--very good. Hospital diet--in conformity to surgeon's instructions. General health of prisoners--very good. Vigilance of guard--good.

Remarks and suggestions.--I would most respectfully represent to your consideration the want of fresh air in all the prison rooms of this building. To my knowledge there are no means provided for to procure this indispensable and valuable gift of God, the windows being all barred and therefore cannot be opened. There being no other means of ventilation connected with the prison, the air necessarily at times becomes so heavy and corrupt that the occasional sickness of the prisoners confined cannot but be attributed to this grievous want of fresh air.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWIN FREY,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Prison, and Inspecting Officer.

[First indorsement.]

Respectfully referred to the Commissary-General of Prisoners.

JAMES WASHBURN,

Colonel 116th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Commanding Post.

6 R R--SERIES II, VOL VIII