War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0062 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

OFFICE COM. GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Numbers 1.

Washington, D. C., January 13, 1865.

By authority of the Secretary of War it is ordered as follows:

1. Section 2 of the act approved June 20, 1864, published in General Orders, Numbers 216, from the War Department, dated June 22, 1864, having modified the army ration, the ration heretofore allowed to prisoners of war is revised as follows, to go into effect February 1, 1865:

Ration.--Pork or bacon, ten ounces (in lieu of beef); salt or fresh beef, fourteen ounces; flour or soft bread, sixteen ounces; hard bread, ten ounces (in lieu of flour or soft bread); corn-meal, sixteen ounces (in lieu of flour or bread); beans or peas, twelve pounds and a half to 100 rations, or rice or hominy, eight pounds to 100 rations; soap, two pounds to 100 rations; vinegar, two quarts to 100 rations; salt, two pounds to 100 rations.

2. Sugar and coffee or tea will be issued only to sick or wounded, on the recommendation of the surgeon in charge, at the rate of twelve pounds of sugar and five pounds of ground or seven pounds of green coffee or one pound of tea to the 100 rations. This part of the ration will be allowed only for every other day.

3. Desiccated compressed potatoes, or desiccated compressed mixed vegetables, in quantity as allowed by existing regulations, may be substituted for beans, peas, rice, or hominy. If the ration of soap, salt, or vinegar is found to be insufficient, it will be increased in such proportion as may be deemed proper by the commanding officer of the post, not to exceed in quantity the ration allowed to soldiers of the U. S. Army.

4. The ration to be issued to prisoners of war employed on public works as announced in Circular Numbers 3, from this office, dated June 13, 1864, is hereby modified as follows, viz: Pork or bacon, twelve ounces (in lieu of beef); salt or fresh beef, sixteen ounces; flour or soft bread, eighteen ounces; hard bread, twelve ounces (in lieu of flour or soft bread); corn-meal, eighteen ounces (in lieu of flour or bread); beans or peas, fifteen pounds to 100 rations; rice or hominy, ten pounds (in lieu of beans or peas) to 100 rations; coffee (ground), five pounds to 100 rations; coffee (green), seven pounds (in lieu of ground coffee) to 100 rations; tea, sixteen ounces (in lieu of coffee) to 100 rations; sugar, twelve pounds to 100 rations; vinegar, three quarts to 100 rations; soap, four pounds to 100 rations; salt, three pounds and three-fourths to 100 rations.

5. The difference between the rations hereby established and the ration allowed by law to soldiers of the U. S. Army, as announced in General Orders, Numbers 226, from the War Department, dated July 8, 1864, the difference between the ration allowed to be issued and that actually used, constitutes the 'savings" from which is formed the "prison fund." All current money left by deceased prisoners of war, or accruing from the sale of their effects; all current money clandestinely forwarded to prisoners or found concealed by them, and all money accruing to the prison fund from any other source will be turned over to the commissary, and will be accounted for on his statement of the fund.

6. Tea and sugar for the sick, when the ration allowed is insufficient, and antiscorbutics for the prisoners generally, may be purchased on the certificate of the surgeon, approved by the commanding officer that the articles are necessary. The tea and sugar will be bought from the commissary and paid for from the hospital fund, and the antiscorbutics for general use must, when practicable, be purchased from the commissary, and will be paid for from the prison fund. When the hospital