War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0050 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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[Third indorsement.]

FEBRUARY 6, 1865.

Approved, unless the prisoners be willing to do so.

J. A. CAMPBELL,

Assistant Secretary of War.

[Fourth indorsement.]

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

February 10, 1865.

Respectfully returned to General Beauregard, and his attention respectfully invited to the indorsement of the Secretary of War.

By command of the Secretary of War:

H. L. CLAY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Fifth indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE WEST,

March 4, 1865.

Respectfully returned.

I admit that it is not "a legitimate work for prisoners of war" to employ them in the removal of torpedoes, except as a measure of retaliation. I recollect distinctly that Major-General McClellan claimed in his report that he had made prisoners of war, &c., move our torpedoes at Yorktown, and all the Federal letter writers allege that Major-General Sherman resorted to the same illegitimate measure at Fort McAllister. In view of this it was that I made the within requisition and legitimate act of retaliation.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General.

[Sixth indorsement.]

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

March 14, 1865.

Respectfully resubmitted to the Secretary of War.

Please see preceding indorsement.

H. L. CLAY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

PRISONER'S BARRACKS,

Hilton Head, S. C., January 9, 1865.

Honorable JULIAN HARTRIDGE, Richmond, Va.:

MY DEAR SIR: You will see from where this is written that I am a prisoner of war, captured about a month since at my home by General Sherman's forces on their advance to Savannah. I reached this place about two weeks since with about 600 prisoners. With the officers I was sent to the prison on this island, where 200 Confederate officers are confined and upon retaliatory treatment. Having shared their privations, hardships, and sufferings for two months, I propose to give you, and through you to the authorities of the Government, somewhat in detail what we have been called to endure and what these 200 officers are still enduring. (Sherman's prisoners are now drawing better rations, in other respects the same treatment.) The prison bounds embrace about fifty square yards. Upon this stand two buildings, lightly weather boarded, about seventy-five by twenty-four feet in size, one small kitchen, and fifteen tents. The remainder of the ground is