War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0040 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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HEADQUARTERS FORT DELAWARE, DEL., January 8, 1865.

Brigadier General A. SCHOEPF, Commanding Post:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at this station for the week ending January 7, 1865:

Conduct-good. Cleanliness-good. Clothing-good, with few exceptions. Bedding-in accordance with allowance. State of quarters-clean and comfortable. State of mess-houses-in good condition. State of kitchen-in perfect order. Food, quality of-very good. Food, quantity of-sufficient. Water-good and sufficient. Sinks-clean. Police of grounds-well conducted. Drainage-very good. Police of hospital-well conducted. Attendance of sick-receive excellent care. Hospital diet-good and sufficient. General health of prisoners-about 6 1/2 per cent. sick, sixteen deaths during the week. Vigilance of guard-good.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. W. AHL,

Captain, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General and Insp. Officer.

FORT LAFAYETTE, New York Harbor, January 8, 1865.

Brigadier General H. E. PAINE, U. S. Volunteers, New York:

GENERAL: I have the honor to state that, as the suspension of my parole by the Secretary of War will be by many persons thought to have been done on account of conduct on my part inconsistent with my parole and instructions, I most respectfully ask of you a close examination into all of my acts during my association with you from December 6, 1864, to January 5, 1865, when I was on parole as "Confederate agent to supply prisoners of war," under the late arrangement between Lieutenant-General Grant and Colonel Robert Ould. I boarded at the Saint Nicholas Hotel for some days after reaching New York; then took rooms at the Saint Julian Hotel, and often took my meals at the New York Hotel. My place of business was at 75 Murray street, and I would refer you to responsible men at and near said places for information.

As my parole, given at Fort Warren, promised to return me to said place at the expiration of my duties, I will state that being much less comfortably quartered here than there, I will take it as a great favor if you will get me transferred to Fort Warren, if by any reason I should not have my parole renewed. The commanding officer, Colonel M. Burke, and the other officers of the fort are kind and courteous, but the quarters are small and crowded and are so dark that it is difficult to read or write without the aid of a candle or lamp.

I am,general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. N. R. BEALL,

Brigadier-General, Provisional Army, C. S., Prisoner of War.

HEADQUARTERS FORT LAFAYETTE,

New York Harbor, January 8, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel MARTIN BURKE,

Commanding Fort Lafayette, New York Harbor:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at this station for the week ending January 8, 1865:

Conduct-very good. Cleanliness-generally very good. Clothing-good. Bedding-iron bedsteads, husk mattresses, blankets, sheets, and