War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 1102 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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The Board respectfully submit the foregoing as the facts established by the evidence taken.

CHAS. E. HAPGOOD,

Colonel Fifth New Hampshire Volunteers, President.

H. Q. SARGENT,

Lieutenant, Twelfth New Hampshire Volunteers, Recorder.

The Board then adjourned sine die.

CHAS. E. HAPGOOD,

Colonel Fifth New Hampshire Volunteers, President.

H. Q. SARGENT,

Lieutenant, Twelfth New Hampshire Volunteers, Recorder.

A.

POINT LOOKOUT, March 23, 1864.

To the BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS:

GENTLEMEN: My name is Edwin Young, second sergeant Company A, Second New Hampshire Volunteers. I enlisted the 22nd of May, 1861, since which time I have been in the U. S. service and have performed the duties of my office faithfully, in testimony of which I refer you to my company and regimental officers. For the past six months I have been on detached service at prisoners' camp as sergeant in charge of two divisions of prisoners, and as you are well aware it has brought me in contact with a great many different kinds of persons. I have uniformly treated the prisoners with kindness and with all leniency compatible with my duties as a soldier, and am satisfied that by inquiries among the prisoners who have had any kind of intercourse with me they will satisfy you that I never have treated any one with undue harshness or taken advantage of their situation as prisoners.

In the course of my duties I was called on last Sunday, March 20, by Captain sides to assist him in providing some prisoners who had just arrived with tent accommodations, and after fitting up a stove in one of the tents, I came in contact with two Confederate officers who approached me and asked if I could get them some whisky, using these words: "You look like a damned old whisky head," and "can't you get us some whisky. " I told them I did not use the article, and the authorities did not allow it on the Point. One of them, Captain Peyton, said: "Do not make a God damn fool of yourself here, you fanatic philanthropist, or you will go to heaven. making this last remark I was busy placing a piece of tent in its place, and after having done so was again addressed by him with "We have got greenbacks, and you will get it for us. " I smiled and told him "no. " He said: "You are a fit subject to be here," and asked me which made the best soldiers, "you or the negroes?" I told him "they made the best of guard," and in reply he said the negro was superior to the Yankee, and that all we ever knew we learned from them. I then asked him which way he meant. He asked me if I was a Bay State man. I told him no, I was a New Hampshire man. He said so much the worse, and I was a fit subject to associate with them, pointing to the guard who were walking on the fence. I then told him he could talk that to some men, but not to me while doing my duty. He then said if I did not like his talk I could leave, at the same time stepping toward me. I told him I should not, at the same time putting my hand on my revolver, drawing it from its case. He told me I did not dare to shoot. I told him I would if he did not dry up. At the same time Lieutenant Dunlap stepped between us, and told me not to shoot and to put up my