War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 1027 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., March 9, 1864.

Colonel WILLIAM WEER,

Commanding Military Prison, Alton, Ill.:

COLONEL: In reply to your letter of the 1st instant I have the honor to inform you that the general commanding the department has the authority to mitigate or remit the sentence of any prisoner tried by a court-martial or military commission ordered from his headquarters; but if the prisoner is a prisoner of war, as is the case with Captain Frost, he remains so still and is subject to the same treatment as other prisoner of war. Your letter of the 1st instant in reference to improvements directed by Surgeon Clark has been received, and in reply I have to direct that no improvements except such as can be made at a trifling expense be made until the necessity is reported, with an estimate of the cost submitted for my approval. Land cannot be purchased for a grave-yard, but it may be rented. Report under what terms the ground now occupied is held and on what terms additional ground can be rented.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., March 9, 1864.

Major General B. F. BUTLER,

Commissioner for Exchange, Fort Monroe, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that the arrangement made by you for the delivery of supplies to prisoners of war by their friends is approved by the Secretary of War. The articles to be delivered will not be limited to specific articles, but will be determined by question of necessity, it being an object to give the rebel authorities no excuse for withholding supplies sent to our own people in rebel prisons.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., March 9, 1864.

Brigadier General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I beg leave to call your attention to the character of the transportation furnished to transport prisoners of war from Johnson's Island to Baltimore in the early part of February and the time taken to perform the journey. By your instructions of the 5th of January passenger cars were to be furnished. They were to be well supplied with water and lights, and the time was to be not over forty-eight hours. The officer in charge of the party reports that at Pittsburg they were put on freight cars which were inadequate supplied with water and lights, and that the rate of travel was from eight and a half to seventeen miles per hour. He does not report the time of arrival at Baltimore, but as they did not leave there till the morning of the 13th,