War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0977 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

myself. I am told by reliable authority that Major White has already purchased large quantities of cattle in Florida, and he has his agents throughout the State. Please given this matter your earliest attention.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. WINDER,

Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

CAMP SUMTER, Andersonville, February 20, 1864.

[Major P. W. WHITE:]

MAJOR: I have as yet only received some 10,000 pounds of the bacon ordered to me. Your agent at Americus did not have on hand more than 4,000 or 5,000 pounds. The prisoners arrive here to-day. Please make some arrangement at once about my supply of bacon which will insure me against failure. Arrangements are being made to feed prisoners on beef so far as it can be obtained from Florida, but it is not yet in condition to drive. Will keep you advised in this matter. Meal I can supply myself with. Major Locke instructed me to call upon you for your present rates of purchase for the Government in the Commissary Department.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. WINDER,

Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

NATIONAL HOTEL, Washington, February 21, 1864.

His Excellency President A. LINCOLN:

In addressing you personally I offer as an excuse a request from friends to do so. My object is to bring the subject of the imprisonment and condition of my fellow-officers at Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and the extreme suffering of our enlisted men on Belle Isle (that rebel hell) before you. Having recently escaped from Libby with others, I can speak advisedly. So far as the officers are concerned their treatment can be tolerated, though it is indeed bad, but the enlisted men are treated brutally, cruelly. Many have frozen this winter; many more have died from actual starvation. From the causes above mentioned about twenty per day are dying, and should they remain during the spring and summer in confinement I am satisfied more than one-half will never again be fit for duty. These men are our best and bravest soldiers, very few being skulkers. Can not, ought not, something to be done for these brave fellows? Should any question of policy stand in the way of their release? Something ought to be done, if consistent with the honor of our Government and the advancement of our common cause. I was requested by Lieutenant Colonel R. S. Northcott, of West Virginia, who is a prisoner at Libby, to call at the Executive Mansion and see you in regard to his condition. He desired me to see you because he knew you to have a warm, sympathetic heart. Colonel Northcott, Twelfth Virginia, has been confined in Libby since about the 20th day of June and would have escaped with me but that his health was too bad to undertake it. The colonel's health, if he remains much longer in Libby, will be wholly destroyed, and should he be soon released I think he could soon recruit his health and enter the field again, which he greatly desires. I would humbly petition you for the

62 R R-SERIES II, VOL VI