War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0954 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., February 15, 1864.

Brigadier General A. SCHOEPF, Commanding Fort Delaware, Del.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that by direction of the Secretary of War General M. Jeff Thompson, of the rebel army, a prisoner of war, has been ordered to be sent from Point Lookout to Fort Delaware. It is desirable that some arrangement should be made by which he can be held separate from the enlisted prisoners.

By direction of the Secretary of War I have respectfully to request that you will send Private Alvin J. Barren, Company I, Thirty-second Virginia, under a suitable guard, to Fort Monroe, to report to Major-General Butler, commissioner for exchange.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., February 15, 1864.

Brigadier General H. D. TERRY,

Commanding U. S. Forces, Sandusky, Ohio:

GENERAL: In reply to your reference of the letter of Colonel Pierson, commanding the depot, in relation to the exposure to violence of prisoners of war who desire to take the oath of allegiance, I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he wishes you to have all prisoners informed who desire to return to their allegiance that the Government is able to protect them from violence from any quarter growing out of the expression of their Union sentiments, and that such protection will be afforded them . He will not consent that they be removed to any other prison where they will be less exposed to harsh treatment from their companions for their desire to abandon the rebel cause. He prefers that they should declare themselves loyal, and he will protect them in it.

I have also to request that an officer may be detailed to take charge, as treasurer, of the money belonging to the prisoners of war. This money has heretofore been in the hands of the commander of the depot, whose other duties do not allow him time to attend to it properly. The prison fund is a different matter, for which the commissary is the proper treasurer.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., February 15, 1864.

Major General B. F. BUTLER,

Commissioner for Exchange, Fort Monroe, Va.:

GENERAL: By authority of the Secretary of War I have instructed the commanders of the various stations where prisoners of war are held to permit no article of food to be delivered to them. The Government furnishes them with an abundance to eat, and the deliver of boxes of eatables from their friends is attended with much inconvenience to commanders, creates dissatisfaction among those who receive nothing, and gives opportunity for sympathizers to show their interest in rebels.