War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0919 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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OFFICE COMMISSIONER FOR EXCHANGE,

Fort Monroe, Va., February 4, 1864.

Honorable ROBERT OULD, Agent for Exchange, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to request that you will give permission to Mrs. G. W. Lathem, of Lynchburg, Va., to come North by Flag of truce.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General and Commissioner for Exchange.

OFFICE COMMISSIONER FOR EXCHANGE,

Fort Monroe, Va, Va., February 4, 1864.

Honorable ROBERT OULD, Agent for Exchange, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: Will your authorities consent to the exchange for Lieutenant J. G. Doughty, of the Federal Army?

This Government is willing to give any Confederate officer of equal rank in exchange for him.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General and Commissioner for Exchange.

HDQRS. MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, EIGHTH ARMY CORPS,

baltimore, February 4, 1864.

The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,

Washington, D. C.:

SIR: In reply to your communication of the 3rd instant I have the honor to make the following report in the case of Beal H. Richardson, Francis A. Richardson, and Stephen J. Joyce:

During the administration of Major-General Schenck these gentleman were sent South for publishing a disloyal sheet known as the Baltimore Republican. For some time previous to the publication of the article which caused the suppression of the paper its course had attracted the attention of General Schnck and every number breathed disloyalty to the Government and encouragement for the rebels. After due and through investigation these parties were sent South with strict orders not to return during the continuance of the present rebellion or to be considered as spies. In defiance of this order Francis A. Richardson and Stephen J. Joyce returned to the North by way of Nassay, running the blockade at Wilmington, N. C. they say that upon arriving in the rebel army. The elder Richardson being so exempted remained in the South, while the other two, as shown above, ran the blockade, returning to New York, not changed in the least in sentiment, but as confirmed and malignant traitors as ever. The good effect produced by their banishment to the rebellious States would have to serve in the rebel army. The elder Richardson being so exempted remained in the South, while the other tow, as shown above, ran the blockade, returning to New York, not changed in the least in sentiment, but as confirmed and malignant traitors as ever. The good effect produced by their banishment to the rebellious States would have been entirely done away with if Richardson and Joyuce had been permitted to remain in New York. general Schenck communicated with General Dix upon the subject, requesting their arrest and transfer to this department for punishment as they deserve. Owing to some mistake this correspondence amounted to nothing, and I forwarded a report of the provost-marshal of this army corps, Colonel