War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0875 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. --UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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as the indorsement merely states that they are not in prison in Richmond, which is but a vague reply to send to their surviving and anxious friends. I trust you will endeavor more fully to inform me where these men are, if in the hands of your authorities.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding, and Commissioner of Exchange.

OFFICE COMMISSIONER OF EXCHANGE,

Fort Monroe, Va., January 25, 1864.

Honorable ROBERT OULD, Agent for Exchange, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: Will you please give me what information you can concerning the present condition of Nicholas H. Thompson, Company A, Thirteenth Ohio Regulars [sic], and Calvin W. Hudson, Company D, Sixty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, prisoners of war in Richmond?

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding, and Commissioner of Exchange.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, DEPT. OF WEST VIRGINIA,

Charleston, W. Va., January 25, 1864.

The COMMANDER OF CONFEDERATE FORCES IN S. W. VIRGINIA:

SIR: I send by flag of truce to your lines by the Lewisburg turnpike a Mr. C. W. Maupin, who has been detained at the military prison at Charleston as a hostage for Mr. Shaw, sheriff of Putnam County, in the State of West Virginia, who was taken from his home in Putnam County and conveyed as a prisoner to some place within the Confederate lines. Mr. Maupin leaves here under a pledge to procure the release of Sheriff Shaw. He is bound by oath to give no military information, and also to return to the custody of the U. S. authorities at Charleston unless he shall procure the release and return of Sheriff Shaw within twenty days from this date. The capture of Mr. Shaw cannot, I think, have been authorized by you. His detention can serve no end, save that of provoking retaliation upon such civilians as may sympathize with his captors, and who, but for such useless acts, would be permitted to remain in tranquillity.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, &c.,

E. P. SCAMMON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., January 25, 1864.

General D. H. RUCKER,

Chief Depot Quartermaster, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: By direction of the Secretary of War I have to request you will make arrangements for the transportation of 3,000 troops and prisoners from Sandusky, Ohio, via Pittsburgh, Pa., to Baltimore. It is desired that the movement should commence the day after to-morrow. Passenger cars will be required, which should be provided with a good