War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0855 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. --UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

OFFICE OF MILITARY PRISONS,

Camp Chase, Ohio, January 17, 1864.

Colonel W. WALLACE,

Commanding Post, Camp Chase, Ohio:

COLONEL: Pursuant to your order I make the following statement; In the months of November and December, 1863, frequent reports were received from the prison stewards and from detectives employed inside the prison that a conspiracy existed among the prisoners, in connection with Vallandigham sympathizers outside, to overpower the guard and break out. In many places they were undermining the wall; arms were found in their possession; their mutinous conduct was increasing to such an extent that the guard had to be increased every night, and the order "lights out" after tattoo renewed. William L. Pope, private, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, Company A, was shot in presence of Captain William Smith, of the Fifteenth Invalid Corps, officer of the day, Lieutenant I. S. Taylor, provost-marshal of prison, and myself, assistant commandant of prison, whilst inspecting the guards together, on or about November 5, 1863, between the hours of 8 and 10 p. m. Standing about six feet outside the gate of prison Numbers 2, I heard distinctly the sentinel, H. Wilson, Company A, Fifteenth Regiment Invalid Corps, stationed above the gate on the parapet, call out twice to a man inside to go back to his quarters and not approach the wall. About a few moments afterward the sentinel called again: "Go back, or I shoot you. " He then fired, and the man Pope was shot, and died a few hours afterward. Since then the inmates of prison Numbers 2 have been quite orderly.

Yours, very respectfully,

A. H. POTTEN,

Lieutenant Colonel Seventh Regiment Invalid Corps, Asst. Comdt. of Prison.

[Inclosure Numbers 3.]

OFFICE OF MILITARY PRISONS,

Camp Chase, Ohio, January 17, 1864.

Colonel W. WALLACE, Commanding Camp Chase:

COLONEL: Pursuant to your order I now make my second statement. The inmates of the different buildings on the extreme western part of prison Numbers 3 had been warned frequently before not to keep a light burning after tattoo, as especially in these quarters they had been found digging; notwithstanding, the windows in mess 49 were illuminated again in the night of November 16, 1863, between the hours of 10 and 12 p. m.

The sentinel on the parapet close by (John White, of Company E, Fifteenth Regiment Invalid Corps) called several times, at that time, to extinguish the light, so distinctly that it was heard by other sentinels on the farther end of the parapet. His order not being obeyed, he fired his piece into the building and killed Hamilton McCarroll, Welcker's Tennessee cavalry, Company B. Since then no more digging has been carried on in prison Numbers 3, the lights have been extinguished at the proper time, and the prisoners obey the orders now in every respect satisfactorily.

Yours, very respectfully,

A. H. POTEN,

Lieutenant Colonel Seventh Regiment Invalid Corps, Asst. Comdt. of Prison.