War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0830 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, E TC.

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from pulmonary diseases and the convalescent ward. Sixth, for the prevention of scurvy in the prison (there are already premonitary signs of it) a large supply of vegetables should be furnished, both in the hospital and prison at large; two rations per week of cabbage or onions should be issued. I would suggest that the whole prison quarters be frequently whitewashed, and that the police details be more strictly kept to the performance of their duty. I would also suggest that an entirely new hospital be erected for the use of the guard. The present one is entirely unfitted for its purpose, both in size and construction.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. CLARK,

Surgeon and Acting Medical Inspector Prisoners of War.

OFFICE COMMISSARY- GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., January 11, 1864.

Major General W. T. H. . BROOKS,

Commanding Department of the Monongahela, Pittsburgh, Pa.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 6th instant, requesting instructions in relation to the confinement of prisoners in the Allegheny penitentiary, is received. It is impossible for me to say how long the prisoners may be retained there. It may be but for a few days, or it may be for months yet, and it will therefore be necessary to make such arrangements for their security and health as will serve for an indefinite period. Some of them having violated the parole which was granted them for their benefit, it is very proper that it should be taken from them, and if they suffer in consequence it is their own fault. But it is advisable that demands, if it can be conveniently granted, and I would suggest that certain hours be given the in the morning and afternoon, under an officer or in the prison yard and that a guard be detailed to take charge of them during the time. Visitors to these prisoners should not be admitted without permission from this office- not even in cases of illness, unless there is something very urgent about it.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary- General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY- GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C. January 11, 1864.

Major STEPHEN CABOT,

First Battalion Heavy Artillery Massachusetts Vols.,

Headquarters Fort Warren, Boston Harbor:

MAJOR: Your letter of the 7th instant, asking authority to appropriate a room to the use of prisoners in delicate health, is received. The arrangement you suggest seems to be a very proper one, and you are at liberty to set aside for their use any one or more rooms which are available for that purpose. It has not yet been decided whether the engineer barracks on the parade- ground can be used by the garrison.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary- General of Prisoners.