War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0826 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VA., AND N. CAROLINA, Numbers 11.

Fort Monroe, January 11, 1864.

Lieutenant F. M. Norcross, of the Thirtieth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, being disabled for active service because of lameness resulting from wounds received before Port Hudson, and yet desires to do what he can for the service, is, at this own request, detailed as recruiting officer among the rebel prisoners confined at point Lookout. They will be recruited in accordance with the instructions contained in the letter to General Marston, of the date of January 9 instant, and the questions therein being asked of each of them before they enlist The book mentioned in the letter will be furnished as soon as possible. They will be enlisted for there years, and for and during the war upon the same terms as other soldiers in the U. S. Army. An assistant surgeon of the hospital will be detailed by the surgeon in charge to examine recruits.

By command of Major General B. F. Butler:

HENRY JOHNSTON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. HOFFMAN'S BATT., DEPOT PRISONERS OF WAR,

Near Sandusky, Ohio, January 11, 1864.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary- General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt on the 9th instant of our letter of instructions, dated December 28. It confirms the construction which I had placed on your letter of the 25th. Your instructions shall be strictly carried out. I forward herewith my report of inspection of this depot, January 9, 10, and 11, inclosing copy of a communication addressed to the commandant of the post, requesting supplies, &c., for the hospital.

I leave to- night for Cincinnati, staying at the Burnett House while there.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. CLARK,

Surgeon and Acting Medical Inspector Prisoners of War.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

HQRS. HOFFMAN'S BATT., DEPOT PRISONERS OF WAR,

Near Sandusky, Ohio, January 11, 1864.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary- General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C. ;

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that I have made a careful and thorough inspection of the quarters occupied by the prisoners of war, as well as those of the troops stationed at this post.

Prison quarters- as regards the prison quarters, there is little, if any, exchange to be made in the particulars given in my last report. Police- the quarters are, with but one or two exceptions, filthy, the prisoners policing or not (after a fashion) as they see fit, no organized system being in force, but the whole matter left to the caprice of the prisoners themselves. The kitchens are filthy, with all their utensils, and the ground around the outer doors covered with filth and slops, frozen to the depth of several inches. The grounds show no evidence of having been policed for a long time. Sinks, disinfectant- the sinks