War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0820 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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ALTON MILITARY PRISON, January 7, 1864.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary- General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: There are a great many of the rebel prisoners in this prison who are willing and anxious to enlist in the U. S. service as soon as an opportunity is offered them. Many of them have been conscripted in the rebel service and are now anxious to be avenged fort he wrongs done them. Others were induced to enter the rebel service through misrepresentation of wicked and designing men, and would be glad to avail themselves of the first opportunity of enlisting in the U. S. Army. Can there not be some person authorized to enlist them! Many of them will make as good soldiers as any in the service. There is another class of prisoners that I would call our attention to. These are young boys, from fifteen to seventeen years of age, who were forced into the rebel army, and who are not a rebel to endure the hardships of prison life. Many of them are now in bad health. Cannot some discretionary power be given the commanders of prisons in receipt to this class of prisoners!

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. W. KINCAID,

Colonel, Commanding Prison.

HEADQUARTERS FORT WARREN,

Boston Harbor, January 7, 1864.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary- General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

SRI: I have the honor to request permission to select a separate room in which I may place such prisoners as may be in delicate health, and who may be really unfit to be subjected tot he confined air of rooms containing from twenty- eight to forty men each. There are at this time three or four political prisoners suffering with diseases of the lungs and throat who would come under this head.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

STEPHEN CABOT,

Major, First Batt. of Heavy Artillery, Massachusetts Vols.

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Raleigh, January 7, 1864.

Mr. THEO. ANDREA, Wilmington, N. C.:

DEAR SIR: There are about 1,000 prisoners of the troops of this State in Northern prisons who are suffering for clothing. Mr. Commissioner ould, of the office of exchange, informs me that money can be sent to them to purchase clothing, and for this purpose I desire a bill of exchange on London. Mu own check on Mr. Colie, for cotton sales, might not be received. Could you give me check on your house, which is doubtless well known in New York, and take my check on Mr. Collie! The amount I desire is $6,000, in two bills of $3,000 each. If you can manage this for me I shall be greatly obliged. Let me hear immediately.

Yours, &c.,

Z. B. VANCE.