War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0792 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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9. How do the number of rations ordered compare with the number of men reported by you "for duty" and 'sick in quarters?"

Compare well.

10. Is there, to your knowledge, any defect in the amount of rations issued by the post commissary, taking the order as a basis?

Having no means of weighing, I do not know. The meat rations frequently run out before the time expires.

11. Do your men receive prompt medical attendance when reported sick?

They do.

CHAS. S. KING,

Sergeant-Major Kain's Battery.

Sergeant-major squad 13, please answer in writing on the intervening space the following questions:

1. How many men have you in your squad?

Total aggregate, seventy-one men.

2. How many of those men are now sick in hospital, detached, and in confinement?

Seven in hospital, 17 detached; total, 24.

3. How many are there for whom you drawn rations?

Forty-seven men.

4. Are there bunks for all men now in your quarters; if not, how many need bunks?

Yes.

5. How many blankets, quilts, and comforts have you in your squad?

About seventy-five blankets and quilts.

6. About how much clothing has your squad received since it came to this camp?

I have drawn for my squad 10 blankets, 4 shirts, 12 pair of socks, 7 yarn jackets.

7. Do you draw rations regularly or not?

We draw regularly.

8. What is the quality of the rations drawn?

Good, excepting meal and sugar, which are sometimes very inferior.

9. How do the number of rations ordered compare with the number of men reported by you "for duty" and 'sick in quarters?"

The rations ordered compare with the men reported.

10. Is there, to your knowledge, defect in the amount of rations issued by the post commissary, taking the order as a basis?

There is defect in the amount, especially beef.

11. Do your men receive prompt medical attendance when reported sick?

They do.

J. J. HORAN,

Sergeant in Charge of Squad, Saint Louis.