War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0786 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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9. How do the number of rations ordered compare with the number of men reported by you "for duty" and 'sick in quarters?"

The comparison is good, excepting beef, which is short in weight.

10. Is there, to your knowledge, any defect in the amount of rations issued by the post commissary, taking the order as a basis?

None, so far as my knowledge extends.

11. Do your men receive prompt medical attendance when reported sick?

My men would have been benefitted by a more prompt admission into the hospital in several instances; otherwise attention has been good.

W. H. KING,

Sergeant-Major Fifteenth Tennessee Cavalry.

Sergeant-major First Confederate Cavalry, please answer in writing on the intervening space the following questions:

1. How many men have you in your squad?

Two hundred and ninety-two.

2. How many of those are now sick in hospital, detached, and in confinement?

Twelve sick in hospital and two detached.

3. How many are there for whom you draw rations?

Two hundred and seventy-six.

4. Are there bunks for all men now in your squad; if not, how many need bunks?

There are.

5. How many blankets, quilts, and comforts have you in your squad?

One hundred and seventy-nine.

6. About how much clothing has your squad received since it came to this camp?

About fifty-five suits.

7. Do you draw rations regularly or not?

We do.

8. What is the quality of the rations drawn?

Tolerably good, except coffee and sugar; at times bad.

9. How do the number of rations ordered compare with the number of men reported by you "for duty" and 'sick in quarters?"

They fall a little short, particularly beef, which falls very short, say fifteen pounds on the hundred.

10. Is there, to your knowledge, any defect in the amount of rations issued by the post commissary, taking the order as a basis?

Not except as above stated in answer to interrogatory 9.

11. Do your men receive prompt medical attendance when reported sick?

They do.

L. C. COULSON,

Sergeant-Major First Confederate Cavalry.