War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0734 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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do to us. He was not allowed to communicate our condition to our Government when he was here, and still our Government allows the friends of prisoners held by them to send clothing, edibles, &c., to them. *

Truly,

---- -- --.

SUNDAY, 9 A. M.

I was never more astonished in my life than I was just now when I went in to breakfast, when I heard that Basil, Cally, and two other officers had been put in the "black hole" for talking last night and were caught by one of the penitentiary attaches. They were all released this morning except Basil who they say is not humble enough yet to let out. I suppose he will remain there until Monday, if not longer. Cally says it is the most terrible place he was ever in and was covered with green mold when he cannot out. Is not this terrible? To be taken up when you least except it and subjected to such infamous punishment. Do not speak of this for fear ma might hear it and would only make her unhappy and do no good. This treatment will profit the Yankees when we get out. Cally says he was not talking, so you see it makes very little difference whether it is the innocent or guilty they punish, just so it is some Confederate officer to vent their spite upon.

THE STATE OF OHIO, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Columbus, December 11, 1863.

Colonel WALLACE, Commander, &c.:

Herewith you have copy of a letter of instructions to N. Merion, esq., warden of the Ohio penitentiary, relating to the care and keeping of the rebel prisoners therein confined, and I ask you conform your action thereto.

It is entirely impracticable to have any divided responsibility in the performance of this duty, and as the warden has the sole charge of the convict prisoner confined within the same walls it is indispensably necessary that he have the charge of the rebel prisoners. All requisitions made upon me by the warden for aid or assistance within you power as military commander at this post will, after approval, be referred to you.

Very respectfully,

DAVID TOD,

Governor.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WESTERN LOUISIANA, Alexandria, December 19, 1863.

Brigadier General W. R. BOGGS, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: In view of the condition of the prisoners of war in my possession belonging to the command of Major-General Franklin, my inability to supply them with the clothing and blankets necessary to prevent great suffering to them, and the difficulty of furnishing them with subsistence and guarding them, I proposed to General Franklin to appoint a commissioner to meet one of his own appointment to negotiate for the exchange of these prisoners as far as he had prisoners in his hands belonging to my command and to deliver the excess, with

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*Remainder of letter, containing strictly personal matter, here omitted.

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