War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0711 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION A CONFEDERATE.

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men into a paroled camp and retaining them there until they are exchanged, does nothing in any way inconsistent with the provision of the cartel or the obligations of a military parole. Therefore it has been the constant practice on both sides, immediately upon the delivery of paroled me, to put them into a paroled camp. The Federals have had as many as 10,000 men at one time in their paroled camp at Annapolis. These men were delivered to the Federal authorities at Varina and City Point, and thence carried to Annapolis and there kept until exchanged. Our authorities never at any time entertained the idea that such a course way any violation of either cartel or parole. Upon the delivery of our paroled men at Virginia or City Point they were immediately transferred thence to a paroled camp, either at Petersburg or Richmond. I think it equally clear that it is no violation of the cartel or parole to require the paroled men to guard their own stores and camp, or to do police duty generally in such camps. In no just sense can they be said to be taking up arms again or serving as military police. The language of the cartel is: "Serving as military police or constabulary force in any fort, garrison, or field-work held by either of the respective parties. " A paroled camp is in neither category. The other phrase, "Nor as guards of prisons, depots, or stores," is not inconsistent with the view here taken. A paroled camp is not a prison, and the depot and stores referred to are those which supply troops actually in the field. Accordingly, I am quite confident that the practice on both sides from the beginning has been to employ the paroled prisoners themselves as the guard and police before of their camps.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

P. S. - I would add further that there was gross mismanagement and negligence in the matter of the lists of the prisoners paroled at Vicksburg. After strenuous efforts I have only been able to obtain partial and very imperfect lists of some of the commands. These are on file in my office. I can have them copied if you wish it. I very much doubt whether the enemy would furnish a copy of their rolls, and somewhat question the propriety of making such a request, in consequence of our quarrel about the exchange of the Vicksburg prisoners.

Respectfully,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, Fort Monroe, December 17, 1863.

Major General B. F. BUTLER, Commanding, &c., Fort Monroe:

GENERAL: You are instructed to take charge of the matter of the exchange of prisoners at City Point, and the prisoners at Point Lookout, Fort McHenry, and at Fort Norfolk are put under your charge for that purpose, and such others will be sent to you from time to time, upon notification to the Department, as may be thought advisable. You are herein instructed not to make any exchange which shall not return to you man for man, officer for officer, of equal rank shall not return to you man for man, officer for officer, of equal rank with those paroled and sent forward by yourself, regarding, of course, from motives of humanity, in the earlier exchange those officers and men on either side who have been the longest confined. Colored troops and their officers