War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0682 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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the best the Executive can suggest, with his present impressions, it must not be understood that no other possible mode would be acceptable.

Given under my hand at the city of Washington, the 8th day of December, A. D. 1863, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-eighth.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, December 8, 1863.

Major General BENJAMIN F. BUTLER,

Commanding, &c., Fortress Monroe, Va.:

GENERAL: I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you that your action in regard to supplying vaccine matter for the use of the Union prisoners at Richmond is approved by this Department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. A. HARDIE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

MEDICAL INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., December 9, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners:

SIR: The following is an extract from a report of inspection of the prison and hospital at Camp Chase, near Columbus, Ohio, November 20, 1863, by Medical Inspector L. Humphreys, U. S. Army:

Prison hospital is in the same condition as last reported, except the wards are not so much crowded. The present number of patients is thirty, a large majority of whom are sick. The prevailing diseases in the wards are chronic diarrhea, typhoid malarial fever, and erysipelas. The mortality in October was twenty-four, out of a daily average treated of thirty. Dr. G. W. Fitzpatrick, acting assistant surgeon, is in charge of the hospital and appears to be a competent and efficient man.

The morality for the month of November is much diminished from what it was last month.

The prison hospital is inadequate to the wards of this place. A new temporary pavilion is in proceed of erection and will soon be complete for use of the prison hospital. The building is unfit and will not be comfortable when completed. I would again urge the erection of better hospitals for the prisoners here, as set forth in my special report made to the Inspector-General last month.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient,

J. M. CUYLER,

Acting Medical Inspector, U. S. Army.

WASHINGTON, December 9, 1863.

General MEREDITH:

Do you know whether the Union citizens, prisoners in Richmond, share in the supplies sent forward for the relief of the prisoners? The supplies are intended for all the prisoners.

E. A. HITCHCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.