War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0658 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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Colonels Boyd, Sanderson, Hunter, and Von Schrader, and Captain Chamberlain. The board will report to Captain C. McRae Selph, assistant adjutant-general, who will assign them to such duties in connection with distribution and delivery of quartermaster and commissary stores and other things sent from the United States for Federal prisoners of war as he may deem advisable. This board, under Captain Selph's directions, will be the only authorized party to sign certificates of issue and distributions, and in case the board needs assistance they can apply through Captain Selph for one or more members for temporary duty.

By order of:

TH. P. TURNER,

Major, Commanding.

[DECEMBER 6, 1863. - For statement of Captain Lewis L. Carter, Company B, Ninth Tennessee, of his statement while a prisoners, see Series I, Vol. XXXI, Part III, p. 347.]

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

Fortress Monroe, December 7, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I was informed upon the return of the flag-of-truce boat from Richmond that the smallpox has broken our among our prisoners there, as it has among negroes here. We are beginning to get it under here. The flag-of-truce boat being about to return to-day, and there seeming to be an immediate exigency, I have deemed it expedient to send the inclosed note to the rebel commissioner of exchange, which will explain itself.

The telegram not working between here and Washington and faster than the mail I could not communicate with you before sending.

I trust my action in the premises will be approved.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

Fortress Monroe, December 7, 1863.

Honorable ROBERT OULD, Agent of Exchange:

SIR: I have been informed that the smallpox has unfortunately broken out among the prisoners of war now in the hands of the Confederate authorities both at Belle Isle and at Lynchburg. Anxious, from obvious humane consideration, to prevent the spread of this terrible disorder, I have taken leave to forward for their use, by Major Mulford, assistant agent of exchange in behalf of the United States, a package of vaccine matter sufficient, as my medical director informs me, to vaccinate 6,000 persons.

May I ask that is shall be applied under the direction of the proper medical officer to the use intended?