War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0654 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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HDQRS. HOFFMAN'S BATT., DEPOT PRISONERS OF WAR,

Near Sandusky, Ohio, December 5, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: Many of the prisoners, especially among the late arrivals, are in need of shoes, stockings, and, indeed, other clothing, to be suited to the climate and season. There is also a great call for tobacco, paper, stamps, &c. ; also vegetables, &c. They have money in my hands for the purchase of such articles. Is it the design that they should be prohibited? Under my present orders to issue no clothing, and there being no sutler to buy of, it amounts to a prohibitions. If they can have them, how can they be supplied? My own judgment is that some one should be appointed, whether called sutler or by any other name, who should supply the prisoners; that he should sell from a list furnished by the commanding officer, on which articles could be added or taken off, as desired. I could furnish you the list and when anything was added to it, send it to you, subject to your approval. I will only further add that I see no medium course. Either that they cannot have the articles, or some one be appointed to provide them. If they were allowed to send to the city, some one must do their errands. If officers or non-commissioned officers, it brings them in such contact as to lead to bribery, &c. Indeed it makes a number a persons to take care of instead of one.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. S. PIERSON,

Lieutenant-Colonel Hoffman's Battalion, Commanding.

FORT LAFAYETTE, New York Harbor, December 5, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have just received your communication of the 3rd instant, which in effect appears to mean that the prisoners shall live on the rations allowed by Government. I would respectfully request to be informed as soon as possible, with a view of carrying out the Honorable Secretary of War's wishes, whether donations from friends are allowed to be received for the prisoners at this post. Money, of course, is excluded, but I mean clothing and provisions.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN BURKE,

Lieutenant-Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, Va., December 5, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the accompanying correspondence between the Federal agent of exchange and myself.

I have selected from the mass of correspondence such letters as relate to matters of general interest, and especially to the subjects of controversy between us.

1. Papers from 1 to 12, inclusive, relate to the arrest and detention