War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0544 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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richer in the aggregate by far then when they entered the lines. The examination was conducted courteously; the rule was forbearingly applied, and their own statements on honor taken as to what they had when captured. All other articles, extra suits, portmanteaus, carpet-bags, letters, money, needles, medicines, &c., were taken from them. Only a crazy head or corrupt heart could confound these lawful proceedings with a refusal to admit foot to starving prisoners; but several hints were thrown out in such a way as to induce me to send everything taken from the party on the boat with them in charge of an officer. I wrote a letter to General Meredith explaining what I had done, on the ground that in these times of cruelty and barbarity to prisoners it might be wise for the Government to bear and for bar much, and that I sent the articles with the prisoners in case he might think it politic (certainly not just) to restore them. All moneys which had been received for the prisoners during their stay, or had been transferred by them to us, or delivered up to the provost-marshal under your circular, were sent to General Meredith, with statements in regard to them.

I remain, colonel, very respectfully, yours,

P. A. PORTER,

Colonel Eighth New York Vol. Artillery, Commanding Fort McHenry.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, Va., November 21, 1863.

Brigadier General S. A. MEREDITH, Agent of Exchange:

SIR: I herewith forward to you Major Carrington's report upon the condition of the prisons in this city, two abstracts of provisions issued for the quarter ending September 30, 1863, and Surgeon Wilkins' report on the prison hospitals. I hope the evidence furnished by these papers will be sufficient to show the utter falsity of the representations of the returned chaplains. I know Major Carrington to be a gentleman of the highest honor and veracity. I am confident that every statement in each of these papers is strictly true.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF HENRICO,

Richmond, Va., November 18, 1863.

Brigadier General JOHN H. WINDER:

SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to orders received from you on the 16th instant, I have proceed to inspect the military prisons in this city occupied by prisoners of war.

On the 17th instant there were-

In Libby Prison building, all commissioned officers. . . . . 1,044

In Crew's Prison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 453

In Pemberton's Prison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,115

In Smith's Prison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 928

In Scott's Prison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,082

In encampment on Belle Isle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,300

In hospital. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 728

------

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,650

In the Libby Prison there are eight large rooms occupied by the prisoners, of which one is used as a hospital. These rooms are 103 by 42 feet. There is a water-closet on each floor. There is an ample supply of water each floor, and there is also facility afforded for bathing,