War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0501 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., November 11, 1863.

Honorable M. BLAIR, Postmaster-General, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I am informed by the commanding officer of the depot prisoners of war near Sandusky, Ohio, that the prisoners there receive communications through the mails from Detroit, where it is said the rebels on the Canada side have a box at the post-office, from which they receive their mail through women or negroes, sent to take them from the box. I have the honor to lay this matter before you that you may order such measures taken as you may deem proper.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commanding-General of Prisoners.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, November 11, 1863.

Brigadier General S. A. MEREDITH, Agent of Exchange:

SIR: The refusal to allow the remains of Captain J. D. Stamps to be disinterred and brought to City Point seemed to be based upon the supposition that it would lead to intercommunication between the respective lines. This is by no means inevitable. I propose that the sad office be performed by those who are already within your lines and who are friends of your Government. Can this be done? The same thing will be allowed on our side.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

November 11, 1863.

Brigadier General S. A. MEREDITH, Agent of Exchange:

SIR: I accept your proposition of the 9th instant for the immediate release of all medical officers held as prisoners on both sides without reservation. Of course I understand that this proposition applies to future cases as well as those now in captivity. As soon as you forward our medical officers to City Point yours will be sent there. Am I right in my constructions that this agreement applies to future captures?

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

Colonel R. H. Lee is now a prisoner of war in Washington. He was severely wounded in the battle of Kernstown in 1862. This wound and a chronic dysentery of several years standing has very greatly impaired his health, never strong, and he now writes that the air and confinement of his prison are making serious inroads on his strength. There is, in fact, every reason to fear that he cannot outlive a protracted confinement. It is earnestly hoped these facts may, in the opinion of the President, be sufficient special exchanges, and that the necessary instructions may be given the commissioner of exchange to that effect.