War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0489 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., November 9, 1863.

Brigadier General G. MARTON,

Commanding Depot Prisoners of War, Point Lookout, Md.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 6th instant, reporting the existence of scurvy among the prisoners, and suggesting that vegetables be purchased for them, is received, and in reply I beg to say that it will be proper to purchase such vegetables as may be required, to be paid for out of the prisoners' fund. By the use of vegetables the saving of other parts of the ration will be increased, so that the cost will be to some extent refunded; but this is not a material consideration. As the prisoners are bountifully supplied with provisions, I do not think it well to permit them to receive boxes of eatables from their friends, and I suggest you have them informed that such articles will not hereafter be delivered. I have granted some permissions for these things, but hereafter I will say it is against orders.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., November 9, 1863.

Brigadier General G. MARSTON,

Commanding Depot Prisoners of War, Point Lookout, Md.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that 1,800 prisoners of war will be forwarded from this city to Point Lookout to-day, and lest you may have a deficiency of force to guard them, you are authorized to detain the command which accompanies them until their place can be supplied by a permanent addition to your command. Please advise me by return of boat whether you will require additional guard, and what number of prisoners you have. Send a roll of this party as soon as practicable. Not knowing whether you have any spare tents, I have requested the clothing department to send by the boat tents for 3,000 men.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., November 9, 1863.

Colonel C. V. DE LAND,

Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your report of the 3rd instant on the condition of Camp Douglas, and I am pleased to learn that the deficiencies heretofore existing are appreciated, and that all proper steps are being taken to bring about the reforms so much needed. I am aware that you have been embarrassed by the dilapidated condition of the barracks, fences, and other parts of the camp, as well as the many other things requiring your personal attention at the time you took command; but now that most of these evils have been remedied, or are in the way to be very soon, and your force has been materially increased, I hope your efforts to bring about a commendable state