War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0468 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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foundation to negotiate upon that Mr. Ould's own letter, in which he asserts that he has 16,000 valid paroles.

Thus far Mr. Ould has failed to sustain himself in own important particulars: He has not established that he had any precedent, as he asserts, for his declaration of September 13 [12], and he has produced not one of the 16,000 valid paroles which he professes to have in his possession.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE OHIO, Numbers 69.

November 4, 1863.

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XVI. Brigadier-General Hascall, U. S. Volunteers, Colonel Love, Eleventh Kentucky Mounted Infantry, and Lieutenant Colonel William Hartsuff, assistant inspector-general, will form a board for the examination of the cases of political prisoners now in the custody of the provost-marshal-general. The board will meet without delay at such time and place as the President appoints, and will sit without regard to hours.

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By command of Major-General Burnside:

EDWARD M. NEILL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON, November 5, 1863.

General MEREDITH:

Your proposed letter of the 2nd instant to Mr. Ould cannot be immediately acted upon. It must be laid before the Secretary of War. Represent to Mr. Ould the suffering condition of our people in Richmond prisons, according to universal testimony, as beyond all parallel in the history of war. It moves the indignation of our people against the authorities in Richmond who countenance or permit it.

E. A. HITCHCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, November 5, 1863.

Brigadier General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that there are at this time 12,000 to 15,000 prisoners of war at western stations, to which number there is reason to believe there will be added 10,000 to 15,000 during the winter, and as it has been found necessary, out of humane considerations, to issue considerable quantities of clothing to rebel prisoners who are generally found in a destitute condition, I respectfully suggest that 15,000 suits of inferior clothing, with an extra quantity of shirts, and 1,500 blankets be reserved in the western clothing depots for this purpose.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.