War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0456 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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be retained for an indefinite period. Arrangements are being made to send a considerable portion to Danville, where we have some large, vacant buildings at command; but as a more appropriate, permanent place of imprisonment I am endeavoring to find and secure possession of some suitable island, surrounded by water of sufficient depth to render an attempt at escape dangerous. Such an island, very convenient, as being near the terminus of a railroad, exists in the Yadkin, and I have made an ernest effort to purchase or lease it. The owner positively refuses to sell or lease, and I can only obtain it by the compulsion of impressment, which I am very loath to resort to.

There are some other islands in the Roanoke River in the neighborhood of Clarksville not quite so convenient which I am having examined at this time by an officer with the view to the selection of one if suitable. I fully realize all the considerations mentioned by you inducing the removal of the prisoners from Richmond and shall endeavor to effect it as soon as practicable.

Very respectfully,

JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, October 31, 1863.

Brigadier General J. H. WINDER:

GENERAL: An arrangement between the Quartermaster-General and Commissary-General has been consummated under which the latter officer assumes the duty of feeding the prisoners of war, giving them rations bearing a proper proportion to those supplied to the army. You are, therefore, relieved from the duty of making provision for them and will direct Captain Warner to discontinue his purchases.

Respectfully,

JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

RICHMOND, October 31, 1863.

Major I. H. CARRINGTON,

Commissioner, &c., Richmond, Va.:

MAJOR: Thirty-four hundred and forty-four dollars were delivered to me as having been taken from Colonel Streight, Fifty-first Indiana Regiment. Of this there were $2,512 in U. S. Treasury notes and $932 in Southern bank bills. The U. S. money was in the original packages as paid out from the U. S. Treasury and had never been in circulation; $1,152 were in $1 notes.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. MORFIT,

Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

[First indorsement.]

NOVEMBER 11, 1863.

I have re-examined the package of money taken from Colonel Streight and find there $1,152 in $1 greenbacks as stated above.

C. MORFIT,

Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.