War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0451 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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York. If he was placed in irons, as the newspapers state, it was doubtless for his security. Since his reception at Fort Lafayette, which is used, as heretofore, as a place of confinement for prisoners of war, his treatment has been, in every respect, the same as that of other prisoners.

Respectfully returned to Brigadier General S. A. Meredith, commissioner for exchange of prisoners.

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.

RICHMOND, October 31, 1863.

Brigadier General S. A. MEREDITH, Agent of Exchange:

SIR: It is very disagreeable to me to complain of the replies which are made to my inquiries. I refer more particularly to the unsatisfactory indorsements which are made in Colonel Hoffman's office. On the 16th instant I requested of Major-General Trimble, also, as to whether he was closely confined, whether there were any charges against him, and whether he stood in any different position from that of our other officers. You referred those inquiries to Colonel Hoffman, Commissary-General of Prisoners, and his indorsement informs me, by way of answer, that Major-General Trimble is "now at the U. S. general hospital, Newton University, Baltimore, Md. " Will you allow me to repeat these inquiries, and especially the one as to whether Major-General Trimble stands in any different position from that of our other officers?

In the same communication of the 16th I inquired about Mr. Alfred Stanly, who was said to be confined in the common jail at Washington, N. C. The reply which I received to that is, "No record of Alfred Stanly or any prisoner at Washington, N. C. " I suppose it is known whether Mr. Stanly is in confinement or not. The place of confinement is not very material. Will you please inform me whether Mr. Stanly is in any one of your prisons, and if so, upon what charges?

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

RICHMOND, October 31, 1863.

Brigadier General S. A. MEREDITH, Agent of Exchange:

SIR: I have just received your letter of the 28th instant making inquiries respecting the officers and crews of the Morning Light, Velocity, and Harriet Lane. You first say, "They are still detained in Southern prisons. " You next say, "The officers have been paroled and exchanged. " I really cannot see how paroled and exchanged officers can 'still be detained in Southern prisons. " If they have been paroled and exchanged when was it done, and by whom? If I have made any agreement as to these parties I will fulfill it to the letter.

If the officers and crews of those vessels are in confinement they are there because you refuse to release the officers and crews of Confederate vessels. The former are very likely to remain in confinement until you release the latter unless I have made some agreement which entitles them to a discharge. I am not aware of having done so.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.