War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0437 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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[Inclosure.]

Report of inspection of camp and field hospital, Louisville, Ky., October 24, 1863, by A. M. Clark, surgeon and acting medical inspector of prisoners of war.

Designation of camp - U. S. Military Prison. Commander of camp - and Captain C. B. Pratt, Twenty-fifth Michigan Volunteers. Command and strength - guard, Twentieth Kentucky Volunteers, 300; prisoners, average, 500. Location of camp - corner Broadway and Tenth street, Louisville, Ky. Water, source and supply - from river by city water-works, abundant. Water, quality and effects - good. Fuel - wood and coal. Soil -clay, muddy. Drainage - very good. Topography - on outskirts of city, level, raised three feet above that of street. Police of camp - excellent; retire camp thoroughly policed daily, under supervision of commanding officer. Discipline in camp-more strict than usual. Duties in camp - prisoners required to maintain police. Tents or huts, position - barracks north and east sides of square. Tents or huts, pattern and quality - one story, in good repair. Tents or huts, ventilation - very well ventilated by shutters under eaves. Tents or huts, sufficiency - for about 1,000 prisoners. Tents or huts, heating - by stoves. Sinks, construction- faulty; not properly drained; new ones are in process of construction in which this fault will be obviated. Sinks, condition and position - northeast corner of square, new ones in center of square. Sinks, management - good, as far as construction will allow; kept clean around, but not properly disinfected. Removal of offal, &c. - except from sinks, carefully attended to. Cooking in camp - by contrabands paid from prison fund, very well done. Inspection of food - daily. Portable ovens -bread good, furnished by commissary. Vegetables - in sufficient quantity. Cleanliness of men and clothing - enforced, in by far the best condition I have yet seen. Laundry and washing facilities - good. Quality and quantity of clothing - obtained from contributions by rebel sympathizers, restricted to under-clothing and rebel uniform; supply sufficient. Blankets and bedding - sufficient and in excellent condition; in hospital, partially obtained by contribution. Condition of men - comfortable. Hospital buildings -two barracks on south and west sides of square. Hospital police - excellent. Hospital discipline - good. Hospital diet and cooking - U. S. general hospital diet table; cooking by contrabands; daily inspected by surgeon by movable shutters under eaves, roof ventilators, and side windows. Hospital capacity - 80; 40 in each barracks. Number sick - average, 35; 10 Federal, 25 rebel; Federals and rebels not kept in separate wards. State of medical supplies and surgical instruments - in good condition and well kept. State of hospital records - carefully kept. State of hospital accounts - well kept. State of hospital fund - $86 September 30, 1863; judiciously expended for extra diet, table furniture, repairs; invoice kept of articles purchased. Medical attendance - sufficient. Nursing - by detail from guard and convalescent prisoners. Interments - by contract. Diseases, prevalent - malarial pneumonia. Diseases, mitigation and prevention of - every care taken. Wounds and operations - not frequent. Recoveries from diseases - very ready. Mortality from diseases - average, 1 to 1. 5 per cent. Medical officers - Surg. J. C. Welch, Twentieth Kentucky Volunteers; Asst. Surg. P. N. Norton, Twentieth Kentucky Volunteers. Remarks concerning character and skill: The condition and reports of their hospital indicate that these officers are fully qualified, and that they carefully and strictly discharge their duties.