War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0436 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, October 28, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith my report of inspection of Barracks Numbers 2 for Federal paroled prisoners, Louisville, Ky., October 24, 1863. I shall endeavor to leave for Columbus, Ohio, on the 30th instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. CLARK,

Surgeon and Acting Medical Inspector of Prisoners of War.

[Inclosure.]

Report of inspection of Barracks Numbers 2, Louisville, Ky., October 24, 1863, by A. M. Clark, surgeon and acting medical inspector of prisoners of war.

These barracks consist of a building, formerly a hotel, on Main streets, and two buildings, formerly warehouses, on Main street, corner of Seventh street, all under the command of Captain Gilmore, Third Kentucky Volunteers. The hotel building is used as quarters for the patrol guard of the city, consisting of about 350 men. In it are confined at present six rebel prisoners, one male and five females. It also contains the cook-house, mess-room and necessary store-rooms for all, including the Federal paroled prisoners. In the third story are two rooms fitted up as a temporary hospital for the guard and containing eight beds. It is not intended for the reception of patients from among the prisoners, who as soon as they require hospital care are sent to the military prison hospital. The quarters for the Federal paroled prisoners are in the warehouse buildings which if properly fitted up might accommodate some 300. As it is no preparation whatever is made except for food and shelter. Paroled prisoners are only retained here from twenty-four to thirty six hours. I could not ascertain the correct average. They run from 10 to 250. Both buildings are in a most wretched state of police in every part with the exception of the female prisoners, which I found in very good order. An attempt had been made to cleanse the barracks just previous to my visit, and the whole building was saturated with water, but with little apparent cleansing effect. The sinks are in filthy condition. The cook-house shows no appearance of ever having been policed and the utensils are not kept in good order. The mess-room shows evidence of having been clean once, but certainly was not so as the time of my visit. Discipline is so laxly maintained as to nearly amount to none at all. A contract surgeon, Dr. E. D. Weatherford, attends daily at the barracks to attend such men as need treatment, but who not require to be sent to hospital. No record is kept of the cases.

A. M. CLARK,

Surgeon and Acting Medical Inspector of Prisoners of War.

CINCINNATI, OHIO, October 28, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith my report of inspection of U. S. military prison, Louisville, Ky., October 24, 1863.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. CLARK,

Surgeon and Acting Medical Inspector of Prisoners of War.