War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0435 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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labored before and I have done some pretty hard soldiering in the last two years. But, thank God, the crisis is past. The sewers are finished, the water pipes are down, and the fence is nearly finished. Three or four days more will make Camp Douglas so safe and secure that not even money can work a man out. The only danger then will be in tunneling and that will not be tried often.

Begging your pardon for taking so much of your time,

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. V. DE. LAND,

Colonel, Commanding.

HDQRS. HOFFMAN'S BATT., DEPOT PRISONERS OF WAR,

Near Sandusky, Ohio, October 28, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: There is every reason to believe we should have had a fight with the prisoners before now if the Michigan had not arrived. The prisoners had in large numbers bound themselves by signing papers to fight their way through and to obey orders. The Michigan canon lie off but a little while on account of the season, nor can any boat be of any assistance much longer, and whatever force is designed to be here for the winter should be provided and arranged for while the Michigan can remain. If her quarters - the Michigan's - were in Sandusky after the ice drives her from her present ground, she could remain much longer than if she has to said for Erie, where she has her winter quarters, and she could also be here much earlier in the spring. Whether such arrangements could be made or not and whether it would be sufficient object I am unable to say. It would depend upon whether she could be as safely accommodated there as in Erie, for dick and slip to lie in, and other similar questions. With regard to the prisoners, I know enough about them to know that they will do any act of desperation and that there should be sufficient guard and the best of discipline.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. PIERSON,

Lieutenant-Colonel Hoffman's Battalion, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

NOVEMBER 2, 1863.

Mr. Fox says the Michigan can remain all winter.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., October 28, 1863.

Brigadier General A. SCHOEPF, Commanding Fort Delaware, Del.:

General Marston reports the arrival at Point Lookout of twenty-six cases of smallpox from Fort Delaware. Please report if it prevails at the fort, and how many cases you have.

W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners.