War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0283 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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but of the gallant and devoted Morgan, whom we know to be thus confined and who is said to be treated as a convict.

In the penitentiary these prisoners can be kept by a very small guard of the State, armed with lances and a few pistols; elsewhere they would require a considerable force of well-armed and disciplined troops. I trust, therefore, that you will no longer withhold your consent to a proposition so evidently beneficial to the State, while the evils said to be apprehended are purely imaginary.

I state for your information that there are about 350 prisoners in addition to those at Camp Groce. From a sense of propriety I send this letter through His Excellency the Governor of the State.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER,

Major-General, Commanding.

OFFICE OF EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS,

Mobile, Ala., September 11, 1863.

Captain J. W. DE BOTTE, Assistant Agent, Demopolis, Ala.:

CAPTAIN: You will proceed to the Department of Trans-Mississippi at your earliest convenience and inform Lieutenant General E. Kirby Smith no prisoners of war are to be released under any circumstances on parole until further orders. Surgeons and chaplains are now prisoner of war. In all cases prisoners must be paroled in duplicate, even when confined in prison. I desire you will use your best ability and untiring industry in procuring certified lists of all the paroled prisoner of war since the commencement of the present war. In all cases procure duplicate paroles if such were even taken. In the lists of prisoners you will see that the proper forms are fully complied with-date of capture, date of parole, where captured, when paroled, when released, letter of company, number of regiment, and the rank of each prisoner. You will see all the generals in the department and give them copy of this letter. You will pay particular attention to the list of prisoners of war at the surrender of General Twiggs, in 1861, to Colonel Van Dorn, C. S. Army.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. G. WATTS,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Agent for Exchange of Prisoners.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, September 12, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: Your letter of September 8 is received. I send you declaration of exchange, amended as you suggest.

Very respectfully, your servant,

S. A. MEREDITH,

Brigadier-General and Commissioner for Exchange.

[Inclosure.]

OFFICE COMMISSIONER FOR EXCHANGE,

Fort Monroe, Va., September 12, 1863.

All civilians who may have been arrested by the Confederate authorities at any time before May 6, 1863, and who have been received at City