War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0263 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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The latter are on the outside of the building and are kept scrupulously clean.

Medicines and instruments of the finest quality are furnished by the medical purveyor of the C. S. Army.

Diet abundant and usually of good quality; is well cooked and generally is in excess.

I purchase any delicacy for special cases that may be required.

In my opinion fewer cases of scurvy have occurred in this prison than would have occurred among the same number of men subjected to the privations of camp life, and I believe the disease could be entirely prevented by the issuing of one ration daily of fresh vegetables.

Added to this report will be found a report of the number of cases treated for the last three months, and list of mortality.

One hundred patients is rather under the average of cases treated daily in prison quarters and on Belle Isle whose names are not recorded and who do require hospital treatment.

Number of cases treated in the hospital during the month of June, 1863. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170

Cases of scurvy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Deaths. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Cases treated in July. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233

Cases of scurvy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Deaths. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Cases treated in August. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247

Cases of scurvy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Deaths. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Respectfully submitted.

JOHN WILKINS,

Surgeon of Libby Prison Post.

U. S. GENERAL HOSPITAL,

Gettysburg, Pa., September 6, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners:

The prisoners of war in this hospital are those remaining wounded prisoners, the severity of whose wounds have prevented their removal to other hospitals. At the date of inspection 594 wounded prisoners were remaining and 109 attendants, also prisoners. Seven surgeons who were with them when captured still remain on duty and are generally useful. The surgeon in charge informed me that he had use for them all, as contract physicians would have to be employed in their place. There are about the same number of U. S. soldiers in this hospital and the patients have been separated as far as practicable. It is a large camp hospital and the patients all fare alike and are well cared for in every way. The camp is in excellent condition and kept in good police; the kitchen well organized and food of excellent quality and well prepared is furnished to the patients. The professional attendance is ample and of good quality. The prisoners are very cheerful and well contended with their present condition. The present guard consists of one captain, one lieutenant, and fifty-six privates. It is very inefficient. Pants, shirts, and socks are needed. A sufficient supply of hospital clothing remains on hand. Have a sutler who is taxed for the benefit of the hospital. The general instructions furnished by the Commissary-General of Prisoners have been adhered to. In my opinion this hospital can be broken up in a month hence, as all the patients then remaining will be able to be transferred by that time to permanent hospitals.

C. H. CRANE,

Surgeon, U. S. Army, late Medical Inspector Prisoners of War.