War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0257 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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parole, and you may therefore expect that as many will be sent to the island as the barracks can accommodate, and you will immediately take steps to obtain such a supply of all necessary stores as will meet all demands during the winter, making due allowance for the time when the crossing may be interrupted by insecure ice.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., September 3, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel JAMES OAKES, U. S. Army,

Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General, Springfield, Ill.

COLONEL: I am directed by the Provost-Marshal-General to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 26th ultimo, inclosing letter from C. P. Robinson asking to be detailed with 100 other paroled men from Benton Barracks, Mo., to assist in enforcing the draft in Illinois, requesting that their services be obtained, if possible. In reply I am instructed to say that the papers were referred to Colonel William Hoffman, Commissary-General of Prisoners, and returned with the following indorsement:

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

September 2, 1863.

Soldiers on parole cannot, without violation it, be employed in enforcing the draft. Respectfully returned.

WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY STONE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Numbers 144.

Cincinnati, Ohio, September 3, 1863.

I. From and after this date no permits whatever will be granted to visit the prisoner confined in the various military prisons of this department, excepting from these headquarters from Brigadier General N. C. McLean, provost-marshal-general, or the commanders of the different districts in which said military prisons are located; and in no case will such permits be given to any citizens without their first taking the oath of allegiance.

II. A reasonable amount of underclothing will be allowed to be sent to the prisoners by their friends; and such outside clothing (of a gray color) as in the judgment of the officer commanding the prison may be absolutely necessary.

By command of Major-General Burnside:

W. P. ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, September 26, 1863.

Respectfully referred to Colonel Hoffman, U. S. Army, Commissary-General of Prisoners, who will please indorse hereon what modifications,

17 R R-SERIES II, VOL VI