War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0238 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

requires that you should answer it in some form before you criticise it. Will you agree to the unconditional release of all non-combatants?

Your reference to the parole of the editors of the Whig and Citizen at Vicksburg has no sort of force. They were paroled by the terms of surrender and not by any special grace of your authorities. You could not have retained them without a breach of the terms of capitulation. Their cases are in no respect analogous to those of Richardson and Browne, except in their avocation of driving the quill. Richardson and Brown will be released just as soon as you agreed to discharge non-combatants.

I still say there is no fair and reciprocal rule which may be proposed for mitigating the horrors of this war that will not be cheerfully adopted by the Confederate authorities.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, August 28, 1863.

Brigadier General S. A. MEREDITH, Agent of Exchange:

SIR: Your extract from a letter respecting Captain Peter Ford and crew of the steamer Emily has been received. I will adopt your rule and decline "forwarding anonymous communications. " If the writer will sign his statement I will refer it for investigation immediately. In the meantime allow me to state that the statement is an infamous falsehood.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

[Inclosure returned.]

BALTIMORE, August 17, 1863.

Major-General FOSTER, Fortress Monroe, Va.:

DEAR SIR: From a gentleman with whom I have conversed, recently released from the Libby Prison at Richmond, I understand that Captain Peter Ford and crew of the steamer Emily, which boat was captured on or about the 15th of May last at the mouth of the Elizabeth River, are in a most deplorable condition and are not likely to survive the treatment of their incarceration for any considerable time. The object of this note is to enlist your sympathy in behalf of himself and crew (the captain being very sick at present) to the end that you may do whatever is in your gower for his release. Captain Ford has been one of the most energetic gentlemen connected with the steam marine of our coast and has been of vast benefit to the Government in many ways. Anything you can do in behalf of Captain Ford and crew will be an advantage to the Government.

Yours, with high respect,

THOS. McCORMICK.

[First indorsement.]

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

August 18, 1863.

Respectfully referred to General Meredith.

By order of General Foster:

J. F. ANDERSON,

Aide-de-Camp.