War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0141 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 227.

Washington, July 23, 1863.

Brigadier General S. A. Meredith will repair to Fort Monroe and relieve Lieutenant-Colonel Ludlow of the duties of agent for exchange of prisoners. After turning over to General Meredith all papers connected with his Lieutenant-Colonel Ludlow will report to the Adjutant-General of the Army.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 228.

Washington, July 23, 1863.

In the case of James Clark Lisle, tried at Cincinnati, Ohio, by general court-martial on the charge of "being found and arrested within the lines of the U. S. forces as a spy," convicted and sentenced by General Orders, No. 106, Department of the Ohio, June 19, 1863, "to be punished with death by hanging by the neck, at such time and place as the commanding general shall direct," strong additional testimony having been produced by which it is clearly shown he was a member of Colonel Cluke's regiment, of General Morgan's command of rebel troops, and not a spy, the sentence in his case is remitted by the President, with directions that he be held and treated as a prisoner of war.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 23, 1863.

Major JOHN E. MULFORD,

Commanding Flag-of-Truce Boat, Fortress Monroe, Va.:

MAJOR: You will report for duty to Brigadier General S. A. Meredith as commissioner of exchanges, assigned to relieve Lieutenant-Colonel Ludlow.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 23, 1863.

Brigadier General G. MARSTON:

GENERAL: You will immediately proceed to the Army of the Potomac and report to General Meade for a guard of about 300 men for the prison camp to be established at Point Lookout. Probably the Second, Fifth, and Twelfth New Hampshire Volunteers can be assigned to you for this purpose. With this guard and such prisoners of war as may be placed in your charge you will return to Washington and apply to the quartermaster for transportation to Point Lookout, where you will establish a camp for prisoners of war. Tents, lumber for kitchens, cooking apparatus, &c., have already been ordered to that place by the quartermaster's department. The camp should be so laid out that it can be extended sufficiently to accommodate about 10,000 prisoners. You will make requisition on the quartermaster's department for twenty horses and equipments for mounting that number of your men for patrols and scouts.