War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0114 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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soldiers not only necessary articles of clothing, but little tokens of affection of no value to any person except the party who was robbed. I commend his report to your attention.

In reference to your vague generalities against General Bragg, I can only say if you will give time, place, and circumstance you shall have full explanation. Colonel Kilpatrick sallies from Fortress Monroe, the headquarters of General Dix and staff, with orders to destroy the farming utensils of our people, that they may be reduced to starvation, and you, writing from the same place, complain that "blankets, medicines, and pocket money" were taken from your soldiers at Harpeth Shoals!

Under the circumstances, the climax of the "pocket money" is refreshing.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, July 13, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel WILLIAM H. LUDLOW, Agent of Exchange:

SIR: I will furnish you a list of all officers now held by us when you forward me one containing the names of our officers confined in your prisons. I have been asking you for such a list, as well as one of the political prisoners, for six months. As yet I have seen neither. At one time I furnished you a list of all officers whom we held in confinement.

Brigadier-General Graham is not here. None of the Gettysburg prisoners have arrived. Will you please explain the extraordinary delay in sending the Fort Delaware prisoners to us? They have been promised time and again, and yet are drinking the poisonous water that has sent so many of their fellows to the grave. In the name of that common humanity to which we all, though enemies, belong, I beseech you to use every power of influence you have to change the place of confinement of our soldiers. If it must be that they are to be kept in Fort Delaware, my next earnest entreaty is that they shall be speedily delivered to us. What possible excuse can there be for keeping the men who were captured at Baker's Creek such a length of time? Even with our limited means of transportation we always have your soldiers ready for delivery at an early day.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, July 13, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel WILLIAM H. LUDLOW, Agent of Exchange:

SIR: In answer to your communication of the 12th instant, I inform you that Captain Henry [W.] Sawyer, First New Jersey Cavalry, and Captain John M. Flinn, Fifty-first Indiana Volunteers, are the officers who have been selected by lot in pursuance of the notice given to you in my letters of the 22nd and 28th of May, 1863. As yet no day has been designated for their execution.

By the next flag of truce I expect to send you a communication more fully setting forth the views of the Confederate authorities in relation to the unjust and barbarous execution of Captains Corbin and McGraw and the measures of retaliation they have initiated.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.