War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0083 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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FORT MONROE, July 5, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I delivered to the rebels at City Point Saturday p. m. and this a. m. 322 women and children; that I have here with me 191 women and children, of whom 191 are foreigners, mostly English and German. Shall I require the adult foreigners to make oath that they will give no aid or comfort to the rebels? All citizens, of course, are required to take an oath of allegiance. No accident has occurred, and thus far all is right and the news from Pennsylvania joyous.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. C. TURNER,

Judge-Advocate.

FORT MONROE, VA., July 5, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

Your order of last evening has been executed, and the Confederate steamer is at anchor eight miles above Newport News.

WM. H. LUDLOW,

Lieutenant-Colonel, &c.

FORT MONROE, VA., July 5, 1863.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

The Confederate tug Torpedo left her anchorage at 1. 30 p. m. this afternoon and proceeded up the James River. Three flag-of-truce boats with 1,800 Confederate prisoners of war went to City Point this morning with rigid orders to have no communication on their way up with any vessel except our guard-ship and to answer no hail.

WM. H. LUDLOW,

Lieutenant-Colonel.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 6, 1863.

Colonel ANDREWS,

Commanding Fort Preble, Portland, Me.:

You will please detain in your custody the rebel prisoners until further orders, for the purpose of affirming an opportunity to identify some of them.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 6, 1863.

Major TURNER, Fortress Monroe:

I am surprised and chagrined that you received any foreign women. You had no authority or instructions to justify it; but having received them you cannot impose the oath of allegiance.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.