War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0040 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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of them. I am unable to say on what terms Varner was released, nor can I say whether he has gone beyond our lines. I will inquire.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.

FORT MONROE, VA., June 24, 1863.

Colonel HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners:

Please delay until I again telegraph you sending the prisoners of war here from Fort Delaware. Military movement here makes this delay necessary.

WM. H. LUDLOW,

Lieutenant-Colonel, &c.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, June 24, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners:

COLONEL: I respectfully request that lists of all prisoners and other persons sent from Washington on a flag-of-truce boat to be delivered at City Point be inspected by you, and I will instruct the officer in charge of such boat to receive no one whose name has not been approved by you.

An infamous outrage unknown to you was committed by sending on the last flag-of-truce boat, under the charge of Major Mulford, Third Regiment New York Volunteers, a woman, who was placed on board by Detective Baker or Superintendent Wood, or both, to be sent to 'richmond and who is a detective in their employ.

I have called for a report in the case, and when made by Major Mulford I will forward it to the Secretary of War and will furnish you with a copy.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. H. LUDLOW,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Agent for Exchange of Prisoners.

The name of the woman as given on the roll is Ann Waters, Warrenton, Fauquier County, rebel mail carrier and contrabandist.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, June 24, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners:

COLONEL: I inclose to you for your information copies of correspondence* in relation to exchange of citizen prisoners and which some time ago were submitted to the Secretary of War, and has his approval.

You will see how impracticable at present exchanges of citizens are and how little hope there is of any speedy removal of obstacles. the only prospect I can now see of such removal is a pressure upon the Confederate authorities by the friends of the citizen prisoners we hold.

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*See Ould to Ludlow, May 22, and Ludlow to Ould, May 25, vol. V, this series, pp. 691 and 703, respectively.

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