War of the Rebellion: Serial 119 Page 0010 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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opinions and wishes of those who, like the meeting at Albany, declare their purpose to sustain the Government in every constitutional and lawful measure to suppress the rebellion. Still I must continue to do so much as may seem to be required by the public safety.

A. LINCOLN.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., June 12, 1863.

NATHANIEL WILSON, Esq.,

Assistant District Attorney, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I am informed through the Navy Department that $175 in gold, U. S. notes, and Southern money taken from the Rev. J. P. B. Wilmer at the time of his arrest was placed in your hands by Commodore Harwood, U. S. Navy. You are aware that Reverend Mr. Wilmer was recently released and sent to Richmond. He now asks for the return of this money to him as his private property, and if it is consistent with what is proper in such cases to grant his request it respectfully desire that you will inclose the money to me to be forwarded through Lieutenant-Colonel Ludlow, agent for exchange of prisoners. It is usual to take from all prisoners any money in their possession at the time of their being placed in confinement and to return it to them when released, unless the amount is such as to show that it was intended for other than private uses.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry and Commissary-General of Prisoners.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY COMMANDER,

Wheeling, W. Va., June 12, 1863.

Honorable F. H. PEIRPOINT, Governor of Virginia:

SIR: During the excitement attending the late raid I shipped all the prisoners then in the Athenaeum to Camp Chase. Among them were the hostages for Trahern, from Barbour County. They petition to be returned to Wheeling as their health is not so good at Camp Chase, one of the number, Samuel Elliott, having lately died. Shall I send for them?

Very respectfully,

JOS. DARR, JR.,

Major and Military Commander.

[Indorsement.]

I have no objection. There are two or three of them that may go home now; we have better hostages. Don't tell them this until I see who they are.

F. H. P.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., June 12, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. LUDLOW,

Agent for Exchange of Prisoners, Fort Monroe, Va.:

COLONEL: Your letter of the 10th is received. * Of course we are bound only by what you agree to, and that is why I wish to receive

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*See Vol. V, this series, p. 771.

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