War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0967 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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been received. In reply you are informed that the law has made provisions for the disposition of such slaves by directing them to be turned over to the State authorities. As negroes without free papers when not claimed by the owners they will be liable to be sold as slaves.

Respectfully,

JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS PAROLED AND EXCHANGED PRISONERS,

Demopolis, Ala., June 3, 1863.

Colonel B. S. EWELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Jackson, Miss.

COLONEL: I would most respectfully request that you give me some instructions in regard to future action in providing for paroled and exchanged prisoners. Many of the men are in a destitute condition, having no clothes or money, and the quartermaster here declares that the men are still under the jurisdiction of General Pemberton and not that of General Maury. The men are very comfortably situated here, requiring to tents, as they occupy the Fair Grounds, and they are much less liable to desert or straggle from camp than when in Jackson, Miss. My own opinion is that opinion is that this would be a most desirable place for a permanent camp, and if your views are consonant with mine I trust you will authorize me to make public such orders as will insure the prompt dispatch of paroled prisoners from other posts, Mr. Robert Ould, agent for exchange, Richmond, Va., having notified me of the necessity of keeping these men in camp in order to effect exchange. As I cannot longer permit the men to suffer I have ordered Lieutenant Gillenwater to proceed to Jackson and procure the payment of men and officers now in camp and those attached to my department.

Awaiting your instructions and orders as to the foregoing, I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY C. DAVIS,

Major, Commanding Paroled and Exchanged Prisoners.

P. S. - I have daily applications for leave of absence from men who live within this and adjoining States who have not seen their families for nearly two years. Am I at liberty to grant them a short furlough for ten, fifteen or twenty days?

H. C. D.

OFFICE EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS,

Richmond, Va., June 4, 1863.

Captain W. H. Hatch, assistant adjutant-general, Provisional Army, C. S., having reported to me for assignment to duty by order of the Secretary of War is hereby authorized and empowered to act for me in all matters connected with the exchange of prisoners as fully and completely as I am empowered to act and will be respected and obeyed accordingly.

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

OKOLONA, MISS., June 4, 1863.

[General D. RUGGLES.]

GENERAL: About 13th ultimo I was detached from the First [Second] Mississippi State Cavalry with my company to reconnoiter the country adjoining the Memphis and Charleston Railroad in Tippah County. I proceeded to Tippah ford, on Tippah Creek, some eight miles west of