War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0824 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF S. CAROLINA, GEORGIA AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., February 2, 1863.

Lieutenant F. S. CONOVER, U. S. Navy, Charleston.

(Through Colonel Gaillard.)

SIR: In reply to your note of this date I am instructed to inform you that you cannot be paroled and for these reasons: The Army and Navy of the United States under the late proclamation of your President are instructed to assist slaves in servile war against their lawful masters, which is not only a high crime under the local laws of the State in whose waters you were captured but is contemned by all people as a means or appliance of war wholly illegitimate between civilized nations. It is purposed that the officers of a service thus found employed shall be held amenable to the laws made and provided in South Carolina for the punishment of those who incite our slaves to rebellion against their matters.

You and your associates will, however, be permitted all possible liberty compatible with your secure confinement, to which end instructions have been given to the provost-marshal. The usual ration allowed to prisoners of war has been directed to be furnished you in strict accordance with the regulations of the United States; that is "one ration without regard to rank" for each officer or man, and such a ration as is issued to our men. You and your associates, however, will be allowed to make any additions to your table at your own expense without restrictions.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. JORDAN,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

CHARLESTON, S. C., February 3, 1863.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Shall I send prisoners of war (sailors) captured in Stono to Salisbury, N. C., or Richmond, holding officers?

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

RICHMOND, February 3, 1863.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Shall I send prisoners of war (sailors) captured in Stono to Salisbury, N. C., or Richmond, holding officers?

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

RICHMOND, February 3, 1863.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston, S. C.:

Send the prisoners to Richmond, retaining the officers.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

CHARLESTON JAIL, February 4, 1863.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding Department.

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 2nd instant and although no reply to it may be thought necessary I cannot permit myself to pass over part of its contents in silence. I do not understand that the proclamation of president Lincoln instructs as you say officers of the Army and Navy to assist slaves in servile or against their masters and cannot conceive that it is so understood by the officers of my Government. On the contrary I am happy to believe that an idea so repugnant to the laws of humanity finds no place in their minds. This I say, sir, only in justice to myself