War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0755 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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We have now more of their officers in our power than they have of ours and are therefore in the right position for holding up their conduct to the eyes of the world and drawing down upon them the abhorrence of mankind.

The immediate effect on the field of battle would be that our men would not suffer themselves to be taken prisoners while the rebels may the sooner yield; and as to other nations such a course on our part would naturally command their sympathies in our favor, and in case of interference it would be to put down a people disposed to act like savages.

I am the more earnest in this view the more I think of the subject, and though I mark this note "unofficial" I shall be glad to have my opinion communicated to the President or used in any manner you may think proper.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. A. HITCHCOCK,

Major-General, &c.

SURGEON-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., June 7, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.

COLONEL: With a view to the provision of sufficient hospital accommodation at Fort Delaware I request such information as you may be able to give as to the probable number of rebel prisoners destined to occupy this post and the probable time of their stay.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. R. SMITH,

Acting Surgeon-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, June 7, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.

COLONEL: The prisoners of war are confined in one of the casemate rooms of the castle. They may need some clothing. If so I will send you a list of the articles needed. These Choctaws say they were forced into the rebel service. I have no knowledge of any troops going South, but will do my best to send the deserters as you request. I do not know where Fort Pueblo [Preble] is to which one of the deserters is to be sent.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. LOOMIS,

Colonel Fifth Infantry, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, June 7, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: What information have you in relation to the effect of the time when General Orders, Numbers 100, went into effect? It was served upon Mr. Ould on the 23rd of May last (as I telegraphed to you) with