War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0753 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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the honor to request you will forward these men by the earliest opportunity with troops going south so as to avoid the necessity of a special guard. There is also one deserter to be sent to Fort Warren and one to Fort Preble.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

FORT MONROE, June 6, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners:

On the 22nd May I gave to Mr. Ould General Orders, Nos. 49 and 100, with notice that no paroles would be binding after that date except those under the stipulation of article 7 of the cartel which provides for the delivery of prisoners at certain points unless otherwise agreed upon by commanders of opposing armies. Please send me copies of all orders of courts-martial in cases of execution.

WM. H. LUDLOW,

Lieutenant-Colonel, &c.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., June 6, 1863.

Captain H. B. TODD, Provost-Marshal, Washington, D. C.

CAPTAIN: I am directed by the commissary-general of prisoners to inform you that the steamer will be here as soon as she returns from City Point, which will probably be on Monday, and all prisoners of war now at the Old Capitol and as many citizen prisoners as are eligible will be sent for exchange. The prisoners Arnold, Hite Bettison and McCorkle will be sent with the rest. Samuel Clawson, wife, daughter and son, now at Camp Chase, have been telegraphed for. If they arrive in time they will also be sent for exchange.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. T. HARTZ,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION,

Convalescent Camp, June 6, 1863.

Honorable HENRY WILSON,

Member of Congress, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs.

HONORABLE SIR: I feel it my duty to draw your attention to a defect in the system of paroling prisoners of war. A number of such persons having lately come into camp I learned from officers and men the following facts:

1. That the rebels administer the oath to privates and non-commissioned officers direct and parole them in the absence of officers of our Army. This is in direct violation of General Orders, Numbers 100, section VII, paragraph 126, issued April 24, 1863.

2. That the oath so administered contains the words "not to aid and abet the United States by bearing arms or otherwise," which is loose and too wide an application of parole, disquieting, by its contradiction

48 R-SERIES II, VOL V