War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0739 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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declaration will be ordered to join their proper commands as soon as practicable.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. T. HARTZ,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Washington, D. C., June 3, 1863.

W. P. WOOD,

Superintendent Old Capitol Prison, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I am directed by the commissary-general of prisoners to request you to furnish him with the number of citizens prisoners now at the Old Capitol Prison subject to discharge.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. T. HARTZ,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, No. 90.

Cincinnati, Ohio, June 3, 1863.

The general commanding directs that General N. C. McLean, provost-marshal-general, at once institute an investigation into the cases of all citizen prisoners now confined in this department, and in all such cases as do not clearly show premeditated disloyalty on the part of the accused or when a desire is manifested to atone for past faults by future good conduct the prisoners will be released on taking the oath of allegiance and giving bonds for the strict observance thereof. The general commanding is convinced that a large majority of the men arrest have been missed by dishonest and designing politicians and he prefers to strike at the sources of the evil and allow those who have been led astray to return to their loyalty and allegiance if they have seen the folly and sin of opposing the Government.

The United States in striving to put down a rebellion unparalleled in history requires that every man at home or in the field shall each in his sphere be enlisted in the cause. The necessity demands a sacrifice from all. In responding to this call the devotion of the citizen soldier stands foremost and his sacrifice is greatest. He gives up all that is dear to the citizen - his home, his freedom of speech and action, the prospect of gain and often gives his life. He exacts no conditions, but surrenders himself wholly to his country as represented by the constituted authorities placed over him. But while he thus yields up his civic rights so entirely to his country he is none the less a citizen; he waives them temporarily to give greater efficiency to his efforts and looks forward to the time when, the authority of the Government restored, he shall again exercise the rights he has patriotically laid down. While the duties of a citizen are of a more peaceful and less exacting character he is none the less a soldier, and it becomes him to appreciate the grandeur and entireness of the devotion of his brethren in the field and to remember that he too has sacrifices to make; but the country's demand upon him is comparatively but small. The country demands from him no physical sacrifice, no personal hardships; it merely asks that he shall imitate the loyal example of the soldiers in the field so far as to abate somewhat of that freedom of