War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0652 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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an American citizen could in that way set aside or throw off his allegiance. It would be a very favorable arrangement for the other party but might embarrass us very much.

I have laid your letters with the memorandum containing Governor Peirpoint's views before the Secretary of War. I have had blank parole rolls distributed, with instructions to use them when prisoners are sent forward for delivery.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

WASHINGTON, May 18, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. LYDLOW:

Captain David Lynn will be sent for exchanged. The Secretary of War will not yet order the delivery of Colonel Poindexter. Two hundred and thirty-prisoners left Camp Douglas for City Point 15th instant.

W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners.

MILITARY PRISON, Alton, Ill., May 18, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that 708 Confederate prisoners of war, twenty-three of whom are commissioned officers, arrived here third morning from Mississippi and Tennessee.

I am, sir, with much respect, your obedient servant,

T. HENDRICKSON,

Major Third Infantry, Commanding the Prison.

MILITARY PRISON, Alton, Ill., May 18, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.

COLONEL: About a month ago, viz, on the 16th of April, I reported to you that this prison was being made the receptacle for all the deserters and other convicts from the various volunteers forces serving in the West. Since that time about thirty of this class o convicts have been received here, making the number of these Federals now confined in this prison about ninety. All of these men have been sentenced either formally or informally to hard labor with ball and chain, forfeiture of pay, &c., for longer or shorter periods, from six months to twenty years. Many of them are reckless and some of them are desperate men ready at all times for any enterprise however hazardous. They have made several attempts recently to escape from the prison by digging under the foundation of the prison walls, but in which attempts they were fortunately foiled by a discovery before their purpose was consummated. Having never been kept in proper subjection these men are highly insubordinate and mutinous, openly and publicly denouncing in unmeasured terms their officers who sent them here, and setting at defiance both by word and deed all who attempt to exercise control over them.