War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0478 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

more to supply them all. These officers generally complain of their treatment at the time of their leaving Camp Chase.

ROBT. C. BUCHANAN,

Lieutenant-Colonel Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, April 13, 1863.

Major-General HITCHOCK,

Commissioner for Exchange of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

The Confederates have released a number of our officers on parole since the proclamation and message of Jeff. Davis. Shall I not exchange Confederate officers we hold for such after I have exhausted equivalents for our officers now in confinement? We have enough Confederate officers to cover both classes of cases. Please reply as soon as possible. A flag-of-truce boat is waiting.

WM. H. LUDLOW,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Agent for Exchange of Prisoners.

WASHINGTON, April 13, 1863.

Colonel W. H. LUDLOW:

Make the exchanges indicated in your telegram of this morning. Ask Mr. Ould for information concerning a report of thirteen U. S. officers said to be confined at Atlanta, Ga., including Lieutenant-Colonel Hapeman and Major Widmer. They were taken at Hartsville, Tenn., December 7. Report specially the result.

E. A. HITCHOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.

FORT MONROE, VA., April 13, 1863.

Major-General HITCHOCK:

All the Hartsville officers except Lieutenant-Colonel Hapeman and Major Widmer have been delivered. Mr. Ould promises to find and deliver these also.

WM. H. LUDLOW,

Lieutenant-Colonel, &c.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, April 13, 1863.

Honorable ROBERT OULD, Agent for Exchange of Prisoners.

SIR: I have just received your letter of the 11th instant and am too much hurried to reply as I wish in detail to the several points therein contained. You are all wrong in your promises, arguments and conclusions. I agree with you that it is useless to argue the questions and I unite with you in the expression of your earnest desire to alleviate the miseries of captivity of officers who have been so needlessly and so cruelly subjected to it by the proclamation and message of Mr. Jefferson Davis. I will acknowledge all proper paroles of our officers by delivering to you equivalents of your officers after the special exchanges of those now in confinement are carried out. This is I believe what