War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0468 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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prisoners come from and who placed then in the station? This is a grave and serious, matter and should be authoritatively regulated. Those who dispatch prisoners to the city as well as those who have them in charge should be instructed to give me timely notice of their being sent and when they may be expected to arrive. In such cases I can have the medical department notified to have a surgeon ready to inspect them on arrival and transportation ready to take them to their destination.

I cut a slip from the Sun to-day in reference to the arrival of prisoners here. The first batch came in due season and have been sent forward. I am yet to learn of the second batch as I have received no information on the subject. Perhaps the nine sick were of this party.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. L. DONALDSON,

Quartermaster, U. S. Army.

[Inclosure. -Extract from the Baltimore Sun.]

ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE OF CONFEDERATE PRISONERS.

Yesterday morning a special train of cars arrived at the Camden Street Depot from the West via the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad with 518 Confederate prisoners of war. Three females accompanied the party. They proceeded under guard to Locust Point, where they were placed on board the steamer Metamora, and at 1. 30 o'clock yesterday afternoon the steamer started for Fortress Monroe from whence the prisoners will be sent up the James River to Richmond for exchange. At a late hour last night about 600 Confederate prisoners arrived at Bolton Depot from the West via the Northern Central Railway. It was also stated that another train would arrive this morning by the same route bringing about 500 more. They will all be sent to Fortress Monroe this afternoon. * * *

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., April 11, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: All the citizen prisoners delivered to us have been declared exchanged, their equivalents having been delivered to the Confederates. All the officers delivered to us whose names I have from time to time sent you have been declared exchanged, their equivalents also having been delivered. I hope that the case of Captain Baylor may be speedily investigated that in case of acquittal he may be subject to exchange with other officers. It is vitally important to know whether the prisoners at Fort Lafayette captured by the Navy will be placed at your disposal in time delivery with the officers expected to arrive at Fort Delaware. No officer of the Navy will be released by the Confederates until these meant who have been declared exchanged and for whom equivalents have been given are delivered within the Confederate lines. Will you please communicate with the Secretary of the Navy on this subject and inform me of his decision by return mail? * * * Doctor Rucker's case is yet undergoing investigation. Doctor Green is half at Fort Norfolk as a hostage for him.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. H. LUDLOW,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Agent for Exchange of Prisoners.