War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0449 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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at Young's Point March 8-a month ago. I delivered to him the evidence of the fact.

Our interview was full and frank and as far as was proper friendly. I send with this two newspaper of April 5 and 7, from Mobile and Jackson.

With respect, yours,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

LOUISVILLE, April 8, 1863,

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN:

Following dispatch just received:

MURFREESBOROUGH, April 7, 1863.

Commissary-general of prisoners has ordered us to send all rebel prisoners of war to Camp Morton. Please any from this department sent to you forward to that place.

By order of General Rosecrans:

C. GODDARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Shall we comply with this or with your last order to send them to Baltimore, received through headquarters Department of the Ohio?

H. G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., April 8, 1863.

Honorable P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.

SIR: Pursuant to your instructions of last evening requiring a report of the circumstances under which cases of smallpox were brought to Baltimore among the prisoners of war just arrived in that city from the West I have the honor to report that ten cases among the prisoners and one of the guards have been reported. It will be seen from the accompanying letter from the medical director at Baltimore that these cases provided for without delay at the Marine Hospital. He informs me verbally that arrangements are made to take from the cars to the hospital without delay any further cases that may arrive.

It appears too from Surgeon Simpson's letter that on leaving the camp (it is not stated which one) the examination of the sick was instructed to the rebel surgeon who was attending on the prisoners and he suffered nine slight cases to be brought with the well men. These are probably the cases which developed themselves on the navy, for unless the infection was very strong it could not be so fully developed in the time required to make the journey.

I am informed by Colonel Donaldson, headquarters, Baltimore, that these smallpox cases came from Camp Douglas, Chicago. Previous to the 1st of March they had a number of cases at that camp but measures were taken to isolate them from other prisoners, and on the 11 the of March a favorable report of the sanitary condition of the camp was made I did not think it necessary to call General Wright's particular attention to this matter, more especially as there was a general

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