War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0441 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, April 6, 1863.

Major General A. E. BURNSIDE,

Commanding Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio.

GENERAL: The General-in-Chief directs that Camp Morton, near Indianapolis, be used as a depot for rebel prisoners of war, and he also directs that you will please detail a suitable and permanent guard for the camp under a competent commander. I would respectfully suggest that at least six companies will be required for a guard to take charge of the average number of prisoners that may be expected to be received at the camp. It is only by having an energetic and reliable commander that I can hope to have the affairs of the camp properly managed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., April 6, 1863.

Major General S. P. HEITZELMAN,

Commanding Defenses of Washington, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: No rolls been furnished to this office of the officers and men captured with General Stoughton, and as such rolls are required to effect their exchange I have the honor to request you will cause them to be furnished in duplicate as early as practicable.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, April 6, 1863.

Colonel J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

I beg leave again to call your attention to the urgent necessity for a permanent guard at Camp Parole. I am informed by a letter of the 3rd instant from the commanding officer that the guard remains as it was as the date of my letter of the 7th ultimo, and while it so continues it is impossible that he can have any control over the paroled prisoners of war. There are now some 4,000 men at the camp and more are expected and it is unreasonable to expect that a guard of ninety men can preserve order in so large a camp.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., April 6, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. LUDLOW,

Agent for Exchange of Prisoners, Fort Monroe, Va.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 3rd instant is received and I will take immediate steps to have your wishes in relation to paroles carried out.